International Journal of Life Science and Engineering
Articles Information
International Journal of Life Science and Engineering, Vol.1, No.4, Sep. 2015, Pub. Date: Jul. 9, 2015
Impact of Breeding Hermaphroditic Melon on Early Production and Yield: Case of Snake Melon (Cucumismelo var. flexuosus) and Tibish (C. melo var. tibish)
Pages: 171-176 Views: 2755 Downloads: 1365
Authors
[01] M. E. Abdelmohsin, Department of Crops Sciences, Faculty of Natural Resources and Environmental Studies, University of Kordofan, Elobeid, Sudan.
[02] A. E. El Jack, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of Gezira, Wad Medani, Sudan.
[03] M. T. Yousif, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of Gezira, Wad Medani, Sudan.
[04] A. M. El Naim, Department of Crops Sciences, Faculty of Natural Resources and Environmental Studies, University of Kordofan, Elobeid, Sudan.
[05] E. A. Ahmed, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of Gezira, Wad Medani, Sudan.
[06] M. Pitrat, Genetics and Breeding of Fruits and Vegetables, Montfavetcedex, France.
Abstract
Melon sex types are monoecious, andromonoecious, gynoecios or hermaphrodite. Monoecious is dominant (AG) and hermaphrodite is double recessive (ag). Hermaphrodite ‘Paul’ accession from India crossed with snake melon (monoecious) and tibish (andromonoecious) to transfer hermaphroditic character into both types of melon. F1 progenies of monoecious with hermaphrodite were monoecious, in F2 segregation ratio of 9 monoecious: 3 and romonoecious: 3 gynoecious: 1 hermaphrodite was obtained. But in cross of and romonoecious with hermaphrodite and romonoecy was dominant in F1 and ratio of 3 and romonoecious: 1hermaphrodite were obtained indicated that hermaphrodite is recessive to andromoney. Production of hermaphrodite melon is possible through successive selfing progenies of the crosses. Hermaphrodite lines obtained from these crosses exceeded their parents in earliness and number of fruits/plant
Keywords
Hermaphrodite, Monoecious, Melon, Sex Expression, Melon Production
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